Category Archives: Political Studies

Need Help-POLS210 Class Project:


Need Help-POLS210 Class Project:

POLS210 Class Project:

There are four parts to your class project: the first three are essays. The final part is a PowerPoint presentation that will display the combined work on the essays. For each assignment, there will be detailed instructions and rubrics with scoring criteria available in the “Assignments” section of the course.

 

OVERVIEW:

 

  1. You are a White House Staff Member working for a newly inaugurated President. The President is preparing the first “State of the Union” address to Congress which will outline the president’s vision for addressing current issues facing the United States.
  2. You will research issues to create the President’s address. The president is not a dictator. The proposals must consider the Constitution, relevant court rulings, and public opinion.

 

  1. After you have completed your research of the issues, you will then create a PowerPoint presentation reflecting your proposed State of the Union address. Think of it as your TV infomercial promoting your plan, and use it to grab the public’s attention.

 

  1. The President (your class instructor) will then review your PowerPoint presentation to make sure it accurately addresses the issues facing America within the context of what is allowed under the U.S. Constitution.

Issue essays

 

Using the “Assignments” section of the classroom, you will write three essays together with cited research sources—minimum of 300 words per essay on each of the following topics/issues:

 

  1. Healthcare (due at end of Week 2)
  2. Economy (due at end of Week 4)
  3. National Security (due at end of Week 6)

 

For each essay, choose a problem within the topic. What are two prominent competing solutions to this problem? Explain which one is better and why. How will the different levels of government be involved (federal, state and local)? This will require research into news recent news articles (published within four weeks of each assignment’s due date). For each respective week, include relevant information from the required readings for that week too.

 

PowerPoint presentation (due at end of Week 7)

 

After you have completed your research of the issues for the essays, you will design and build a presentation that represents each of the above issues and proposed solutions. This is an opportunity for you to use your creative side. You will use a minimum of three slides for each issue for a total of at least nine slides.

Need Help-POLS210 Class Project:

American politics


Buy custom essay on this assignment here (Email us: writersestate@gmail.com)

American politics

Dear, here is the instrctions bellow, please do not make mistakes like the previous papers which were completely wrong

GROUND RULES:  Your response to the question below should be 3-4 pages in length (double-spaced, using regular 12 point font and margins).  This is an open-book take-home exam, so you should use the assigned readings and your notes to formulate your response to the question.  Since this is an exam, however, you are on your honor not to discuss the content of your response with classmates.  The exam is due in class on Wednesday, April 6th.  Any exam received after class will be marked down one grade (e.g., A to A-) for each additional calendar day the exam is late.  Exams submitted via email on the due date without prior permission of the instructor will be marked down one grade.  In most cases, extension of the deadline will only be granted with an appropriately documented personal or family emergency.  If you anticipate a problem with the deadline, please let me know immediately.

HELPFUL HINTS:  Your exam should use the ideas and events presented in the readings and in class to develop a focused and structured response to the question.  Simply recounting history during relevant periods will be insufficient.  You need to use that history to make broader arguments about key ideas and concepts, as dictated by the question.  If you quote particular readings, you do not need to give a formal footnote, but include relevant page numbers in parentheses after the quote.  Please spell-check your response and include page numbers on your document.

Please answer BOTH parts A and B of the following question in your essay:

A.    Why is it so difficult for the two major political parties in Congress to articulate a coherent policy agenda?

B.    Is there anything that Congressional leaders can do to make their legislative body run more efficiently?

John Locke – theory of social contract


Buy custom essay on this assignment here (Email us: writersestate@gmail.com)

John Locke – theory of social contract

The essay is to be six pages, and cannot use any external resources other than the book/class lectures. If it does, it gets counted as plagiarism so I’d like to ask that you are careful , thank you for this. The question is below:

This question has two parts: John Locke’s theory of the social contract is one of the foundational stones of the American constitutional system. This is because the entire goal of the Second Treatise is to outline the limits of legitimate power. As such, he also provides us with a rationale for judging when power has overstepped its legitimate boundaries and violated the fiduciary grant made to the government. Part 1): In an essay describe in broad outlines the nature of this fiduciary grant. Why is it needed? Next, recall the allowance Locke makes for exigencies in his notion of executive prerogative. As we discussed in class, executive prerogative gives the executive branch wide latitude in acting to defend society, even if sometimes this means that some cherished aspects of the social contract (e.g., the constitution) need to be violated. Part 2): Under what conditions would you be comfortable with the exercise of this prerogative? How would you justify this power given the importance Locke (and the American founding fathers, broadly defined) placed on limited government?

[Helpful Hint: For the first part of the essay, it might be useful to draw in the broadest outlines how Locke understands the state of nature, the injunctions given to man by God, the problems that arise therein, etc. In other words, give an account of man’s journey from the state of nature to civil society].

Link to John Lockes second treatise – http://www.gutenberg.org/files/7370/7370-h/7370-h.htm

LEARNING ACTIVITY WORKSHEET – Week Two


LEARNING ACTIVITY WORKSHEET – Week Two

Please review the full assignment prompt located within the classroom and in the POL 201 Course Guide before beginning this assignment.

Utilizing the worksheet below, develop detailed paragraphs that focus onthe secondmain point for your final paper. For each section, a minimum of one fully-developed paragraph is required.  Each paragraph should include at least one in-text APA citation that provides support for the topic.

At least two scholarly sources from the Ashford University library (not including your textbook) with in-text citations utilized within your paragraphs are required.  Two new sources should be utilized each week to meet the minimum of eight required sources for the final paper.  By finding and supporting your material with these sources each week, you will have the research necessary to construct a strong final paper. For help withwriting and citations, please review the handouts and tutorials provided by the Ashford Writing Center.

  1. Federalism:
  2. One advantage to a national policy that must be implemented by one agency of the federal bureaucracy.

(Use the space below to complete this section.)

 

 

  1. One disadvantage to a national policy that must be implemented by one agency of the federal bureaucracy.

(Use the space below to complete this section.)

 

 

 

  1. One option to maintain the advantage of the national policy discussed above.

(Use the space below to complete this section.)

 

 

 

 

  1. One option to improve the disadvantage of the national policy discussed above.

(Use the space below to complete this section.)

 

 

  1. Reference List (utilizing full APA citations)

(Use the space below to complete this section.)

Death Penalty Issues in Canada


Assignment 2—Argument Paper Worth 15%.

Death Penalty Issues in Canada

  1. Should Canada reinstate the death penalty in the Canadian constitution?
  2. Individuals of note: Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau, Prime Minister Stephen Harper, Pierre Trudeau
  3. Historical outline:
  4. 1892-1961 all murderers were subjected to death by hanging. This was after a bill calling for the abolition of the death penalty was introduced in 1914 in the House of Commons. Following a lengthy and emotional debate in 1966, the Canadian government introduced and passed a bill, Bill C-168 (Victims of Violence, 2016).
  5. On July 14, 1976, another bill, Bill C-84 was passed by the House of Commons on a free vote and this abolished the capital punishment from the Canadian Criminal Code. Despite the country adopting some sections of the death penalty for some military offences, no Canadian soldier has since been executed for more than 50 years now (Victims of Violence, 2016).
  6. The overall conviction rate between murder and life has since increased over the last two decades. This is an indicator that the Canadian juries are more interested in convicting offenders to death sentences. This is driven by the public pressure on the judicial system in Canada as more citizens are in support of the death sentence even though a bill to reinstate death sentence was defeated in 1987 (Victims of Violence, 2016).
  7. Argument framework:
  8. Conclusion: Canada should not reinstate the death penalty
  9. According to Goffin (2011), while making reference to Pierre Trudeau, it is the right of the society to punish criminals with a penalty equally to the crime, but killing is more of revenge than an act of correction.
  10. It is not right for a society to express vengeance against offenders but have a collective responsibility to criminal behavior
  11. If the system is allowed to eliminate boundless hope and confidence in its people, the people themselves will lack maturity and fail to act as mature people as well as lose the ability to value life (Goffin, 2011).

References

  1. Goffin, P. (2011). Canada marks 35 years since abolition of the death penalty. Retrieved from:

https://this.org/2011/07/29/35-years-without-death-penalty/

 

  1. Victims of Violence (2016). Research library — capital punishment. Retrieved from:

http://www.victimsofviolence.on.ca/research-library/capital-punishment/

 

Assignment 2—Argument Paper Worth 15%.

Due by last day of week 12

Description This assignment should help you draw together many of the skills and much of the knowledge you have gained thus far from the course. Your assignment is to design both sides of an argument that could be used as the basis for a persuasive essay. Building on the issue you researched in Assignment 1, you are to come up with opposite conclusions and show how you would go about supporting these opposites. Tasks 1. Issue: Articulate a current Canadian issue in your own words. It must be expressed as a question in a single, grammatically correct sentence. The issue must be relevant to the society as a whole and the public decision-making process. Format example: • “Should Canada dissolve as a federation and the provinces become new States in the USA?” (note this is not a proper example of the type of content that is suitable as this is not an issue that is currently being debated in reputable national media sources) 2. Conclusions: State two conclusions as single, grammatically correct sentences– one for each side of the issues. Do not include reasons or qualifications that are not in the issue statement. Here is an example to illustrate format: • “Yes, Canada should dissolve as a federation and the provinces become new States in the USA.” • “No, Canada should not dissolve as a federation and the provinces become new States in the USA.” 3. Premise 1: In your own words, give a clear, objective, and grammatically correct sentence that is a supportive reason for the positive conclusion. 4. Find a single-sentence quote that gives direct support for the positive conclusion and is based on objective reasoning. Then, using APA format, cite the source. Here is an example to illustrate format: • “Evidence overwhelmingly suggests that the majority of Canadians would refuse to pay US taxes, creating insurmountable political instability”. (Author, A. A., & Author, B. B. (Date of publication). Title of article. Title of Online Periodical, volume number(issue number if available). Retrieved from http://www.someaddress.com/full/url/ 5. Premise 2: Premise 1: In your own words, give a clear, objective, and grammatically correct sentence that is a supportive reason for the negative conclusion. 6. Find a single-sentence quote that gives direct support for the negative conclusion and is based on objective reasoning. Then, using APA format, cite the source. Here is an example to illustrate format: • “Canadian Business overwhelmingly supports dissolution, according to a national survey”. (Author, A. A. (Year, Month Day). Title of article. Title of Newspaper. Retrieved from http://www.someaddress.com/full/url/ Task Grade Criteria 1 (Issue) /3 Must be current, of national interest, and clearly stated according to the terms prescribed in the task description. 2 (Conclusions) /2 Each one must be clearly stated according to the terms prescribed in the task description. 3 (Premise 1) /2 Must be clearly stated according to the terms prescribed in the task description and include all required parts. 4 (Quote 1) /3 Must be clearly stated according to the terms prescribed in the task description and include all required parts. 5 (Premise 2) /2 Must be clearly stated according to the terms prescribed in the task description and include all required parts. 6 (Quote 2) /3 Must be clearly stated according to the terms prescribed in the task description and include all required parts. Total /15

 

PO 5002: The 2011 NATO Intervention in Libya.


PO 5002: International Relations and Development
The Theory Review (2000 words) 
The 2011 NATO Intervention in Libya.

Paper details:

UseChoose one international political process to examine:
 The 2011 NATO Intervention in Libya
Step 2: Choose two theories to analyse and interpret this process:
 Classical Realism
 Liberal Internationalism
PO 5002: International Relations and Development
The Theory Review (2000 words) 
Please read these instructions carefully Assessment Outline: This assessment is designed to test your ability to apply the international relations theories that we have examined in Teaching Block 2, by using them to examine of a specific international political process or series of events The assessment requires you to produce a 2000 word written piece, where you use two IR theories to analyse and interpret an international political process chosen from the list below To do this, you will need to conduct some personal research into the political process that you choose to examine, using resources available in academic books, journals and from reputable online sources You will also need to engage with advanced theory literature, including original texts where appropriate. Guidelines:  Think about the characteristics of the theories you choose, the understanding of the world they produce, and how this relates to some of the key themes associated with the international political process you have chosen  The ‘theory as a lens’ metaphor might be useful here. If you look at your chosen political process, through the ‘lenses’ of your chosen theories, what kinds of things do you see?  Think carefully about which two theories you think will be most helpful in analysing and interpreting the international political process you choose  You will need a solid understanding of the chosen process you are analysing and the characteristics of the theories you are using. However, it is essential that you show you are able to use the theories to analyse and interpret the process you choose  There is a detailed reading list provided in the module guide for each of the international relations theories  To research your chosen political process, you will need to learn how to search for journal articles, search the library catalogue for academic books and locate reputable online resources. This kind of independent research is an essential skill for your advanced research project in the third year  The theory review does need to be fully referenced, but the bibliography is excluded from the word count 2 What Not to Do!  This assessment is not aimed at testing your ability to describe the theories and processes you choose. To perform well, you will need to show that you can apply these theories in an analysis of a specific international political process  You do not need to provide an extensive description of the political process that you are examining. What you will need to do when you research this process is to draw out some of the important themes associated with this process  Similarly, you do not need to provide an extensive description of your chosen theory. You will need to demonstrate that you understand this theory by applying it competently in analysing and interpreting the process you choose to explore Step 1: Choose one international political process to examine:  The 2011 NATO Intervention in Libya  The foreign policy of the Bush Administration (2000-2008)  The Ukraine Crisis of 2014 and the Russian annexation of Crimea  The foundation of the International Criminal Court (ICC)  The emergence of the Responsibility to Protect (R2P) concept in international relations  The rise of ethics and values in UK foreign policy discourse since 1997  International negotiations on climate change since 1992  The United Nations Millennium Development Goals programme  The rise of China and India as potential challengers to US hegemony in International Relations Step 2: Choose two theories to analyse and interpret this process:  Classical Realism  Liberal Internationalism  Neo-realism  Neo-liberalism  The English School  Critical Theory  Constructivism  Post-structuralism 3 What am I looking for in your theory review? In addition to the qualities explained in the marking criteria on pages 8-9 of the module guide, I am looking for several important features in your theory review:  A Strong Understanding of the Theories and Process: You will be expected to provide an accurate and well informed representation of both the two theories chosen and the process you are analysing. You will need to look beyond the basic textbooks to help solidify your knowledge and understanding. Marks will be lost for errors of fact and overt misrepresentation or misunderstanding of theory content.  Good Personal Research Skills: Although a short piece, the theory review requires careful researching of the theories and process under discussion. You should base your analysis on a range of advanced academic sources (books and journal articles), many of which are listed in the module guide. Use of reputable online sources (such as those mentioned in the module guide) is acceptable. However, over-reliance on new media sources (e.g. BBC, The Economist, CNN etc.) and the use of unreliable online sources will be penalised.  Analysis and Argumentation: I will look closely at your ability to use the theories to help you interpret the process under discussion. You need to use theory as a ‘lens’ to help you develop a more nuanced and sophisticated explanation of the process you are examining. Your analysis needs to be logical and supported by appropriate evidence where necessary. You will need to think carefully about the structuring of your review and the organisation of your analysis.  Quality of Written Expression: The ability of your written English to convey complex ideas and facts in a clear, concise, elegant and exact manner is very important. Grammar, vocabulary, punctuation, organisation of sentences and paragraphs are all important elements of this.

History of national party nominating conventions in the US


History of national party nominating conventions in the US

Instructions

Papers should be five double-spaced pages and contain in-text citations where applicable.

Answer the following questions in a well-developed essay. Remember to use specific examples from class.

  • Review the history of national party nominating conventions.
    • What are the formal and informal purposes?
    • How and why have nominating conventions changed over the years?
    • What factors influenced those changes?
  • Reflect upon the 2016 Republican and Democrat Party nominating conventions.
    • How were the 2016 conventions different than previous years?
    • How were they similar?
    • Did you find anything regarding the conventions surprising?
    • What event at both conventions did you find the most interesting?

Political Risk Management: Module Assessment


Political Risk Management: Module Assessment

Depressed oil prices and the need to diversify the Saudi economy away from its reliance on oil, has culminated in the announcement by the government of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia that it will sell a stake in Saudi Aramco. There has been much speculation about the structure of an IPO and the Kingdom has astounded markets by stating its intention to sell a 5% stake in the parent company, which controls exploration and production. Investment in Saudi Aramco is a unique opportunity but one that is beset by risks.

You are the Chief Risk Manager of a UK oil major that is considering taking a significant stake in the IPO. The CEO has asked you to write an initial political risk assessment of the proposed investment to present at the next company board meeting.

You have been asked to limit the assessment to 2,000 words and to analyse the range of political risk factors that could impact the investment. Market and credit risk factors will be addressed by your colleague in the credit team.

You must submit your report by  the morning of Friday 1st July to enable board members to read the document in advance of the board meeting.

More lecture slides can be accessed here -https://www.dropbox.com/sh/kjk4ea5qaohdhoi/AAC1UOFtMPoAYzc9edPYD4lla?dl=0

Simulation Assignment #3 – Writing Legislation


Simulation Assignment #3 – Writing Legislation

Due: April 10th at 11:59 PM (on Moodle)

Length: No more than two pages (following the format of the sample legislation) There are several different types of legislation. For this

Due: April 10th at 11:59 PM (on Moodle)

Length: No more than two pages (following the format of the sample legislation) There are several different types of legislation. For this assignment you are writing a “public bill” for introduction into the House of Representatives. Public bills are items of legislation that affect the general welfare or address a general question. Therefore, you’re writing a potential policy that affects a wide range of the general public (or, at least, your constituents). Your public bill will be placed on the House Calendar. Again, there are several different types of legislative calendars depending on the type of legislation being debated. However, we are simplifying the process by using a single calendar for all bills. All bills will be introduced in the second session of the 114th Congress. You do not need to give your bill an “H.R. number.” Use the sample legislation as a formatting guide. Use the following websites to find legislation introduced by the representative you are playing, or create your own legislation based on your representative’s policy goals (refer to assignment #2 for ideas). Use any legislation you find as a guide, but know that you not not have include every single aspect of the legislation into your assignment. Your representative’s .gov website The library of Congress database – http://www.congress.gov (you can search by House member) Steps for Writing your Legislation Step 1 – Write a statement of purpose for the legislation you intend to propose. Some elements are common to all pieces of legislation. For example, every piece of legislation has a statement of purpose that can be found directly beneath its number. This statement of purpose explains what the bill is about. If you look at the sample legislation, you’ll notice these statements of purpose come immediately following the notation, “A bill to…” Step 2 – Give your legislation a title. In addition to a statement of purpose, most major legislation also includes a title—that is, a way of referring to the legislation. Sometimes these titles are simply descriptive (e.g., “Nuclear Threat Reduction Act”); other times, they can be catchy phrases or can be converted to easy-to-remember acronyms (e.g, “Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act or RICO). The title should begin “Section 1” after your statement of purpose. Below the title you need to include a brief paragraph telling everyone that you are introducing the bill. Additionally, you should include the committee you would like the bill to be referred to. Therefore, you need to review the committee descriptions to ensure you select the appropriate committee (found at the end of this document). It is generally a good idea to pick a policy issue covered by the committee you are assigned to. Step 3 – Draft as least one, but as many as are needed, statements of findings or “whereas” clauses for your legislation. Many pieces of legislation include a justification for the legislation. In this case, the justification comes in the form of a statement of findings, which comes after your title. You will need to present some justification for your legislation. Step 3 – Outline the major themes of your legislation. The remainder of the legislation should be focused on the substance of what it is you are trying to accomplish. As you write this section, you will need to separate your main ideas into major headings and include details about each of the subheadings. These details could include the appropriation of funds to support the legislation; they might specify to whom the legislation will apply (what part of the population?); and/or these details may simply clarify your major themes. Be as broad or specific as you feel is necessary to get your message across. Your major themes should be a part of section 3 in your legislation. Refer to the sample legislation to guide you through this process. Step 4 – Draft the approach sunrise and sunset provisions in your legislation. A sunrise provision sets a date for the legislation to take effect. A sunset provision sets a date—if you so desire—for the legislation to expire. All legislation includes some form of sunrise provisions. Your sunrise/sunset provisions should be a part of section 3 of your legislation. Sample Legislation **Here’s the link to the actual legislation introduced by Brad Sherman (D-CA) I used to create this sample: https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/4312?resultIndex=2 114th Congress 2nd Session H.R. XXXX A bill to amend the Iran Threat Reduction and Syrian Human Rights Act of 2012 to require the President to block and prohibit transactions in property and property interests of a foreign person that knowingly supports certain transactions with Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) or other sanctioned persons if that property and those property interests are in the United States, come within the United States, or are or come within the possession or control of a U.S. person. Section 1. Title: Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps Sanctions Implementation and Review Act Mr. Sherman (for himself) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on International Relations and National Security. Section 2. Statements of Findings: (1) The IRGC has helped train and equip proxy groups and Iraqi Shiite insurgents, and elements of the Taliban, which have targeted and killed United States and other allied forces in Iraq and Afghanistan (2) The Government of Iran continues to engage in serious, systematic, and ongoing violations of human rights, including suppression of freedom of expression and religious freedom, illegitimate detention, torture, and executions, without affording anything resembling an adequate due process. (3) The IRGC plays a significant role in many of Iran’s human rights abuses. (4) Strengthening sanctions against the IRGC, ensuring that the United States Government identify and designate more of the affiliated entities through which the IRGC operates will help deprive the IRGC of resources needed to carry out its nefarious activities. Section 3. Major Themes: (1) Amend subsection (b) of section 302 of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syrian Human Rights Act of 2012 by adding, “the President shall block and prohibit all transactions in property and interests in property with respect to such foreign person if such property and interests in property are in the United States, come within the United States, or are or come within the possession or control of a United States person.” (2) The Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the President and the appropriate congressional committees a report identifying foreign persons not currently subject to sanctions under subsection (b) of section 302 who knowingly engaging in an activity described

Length: No more than two pages (following the format of the sample legislation) There are several different types of legislation. For this assignment you are writing a “public bill” for introduction into the House of Representatives. Public bills are items of legislation that affect the general welfare or address a general question. Therefore, you’re writing a potential policy that affects a wide range of the general public (or, at least, your constituents). Your public bill will be placed on the House Calendar. Again, there are several different types of legislative calendars depending on the type of legislation being debated. However, we are simplifying the process by using a single calendar for all bills. All bills will be introduced in the second session of the 114th Congress. You do not need to give your bill an “H.R. number.” Use the sample legislation as a formatting guide. Use the following websites to find legislation introduced by the representative you are playing, or create your own legislation based on your representative’s policy goals (refer to assignment #2 for ideas). Use any legislation you find as a guide, but know that you not not have include every single aspect of the legislation into your assignment. Your representative’s .gov website The library of Congress database – http://www.congress.gov (you can search by House member) Steps for Writing your Legislation Step 1 – Write a statement of purpose for the legislation you intend to propose. Some elements are common to all pieces of legislation. For example, every piece of legislation has a statement of purpose that can be found directly beneath its number. This statement of purpose explains what the bill is about. If you look at the sample legislation, you’ll notice these statements of purpose come immediately following the notation, “A bill to…” Step 2 – Give your legislation a title. In addition to a statement of purpose, most major legislation also includes a title—that is, a way of referring to the legislation. Sometimes these titles are simply descriptive (e.g., “Nuclear Threat Reduction Act”); other times, they can be catchy phrases or can be converted to easy-to-remember acronyms (e.g, “Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act or RICO). The title should begin “Section 1” after your statement of purpose. Below the title you need to include a brief paragraph telling everyone that you are introducing the bill. Additionally, you should include the committee you would like the bill to be referred to. Therefore, you need to review the committee descriptions to ensure you select the appropriate committee (found at the end of this document). It is generally a good idea to pick a policy issue covered by the committee you are assigned to. Step 3 – Draft as least one, but as many as are needed, statements of findings or “whereas” clauses for your legislation. Many pieces of legislation include a justification for the legislation. In this case, the justification comes in the form of a statement of findings, which comes after your title. You will need to present some justification for your legislation. Step 3 – Outline the major themes of your legislation. The remainder of the legislation should be focused on the substance of what it is you are trying to accomplish. As you write this section, you will need to separate your main ideas into major headings and include details about each of the subheadings. These details could include the appropriation of funds to support the legislation; they might specify to whom the legislation will apply (what part of the population?); and/or these details may simply clarify your major themes. Be as broad or specific as you feel is necessary to get your message across. Your major themes should be a part of section 3 in your legislation. Refer to the sample legislation to guide you through this process. Step 4 – Draft the approach sunrise and sunset provisions in your legislation. A sunrise provision sets a date for the legislation to take effect. A sunset provision sets a date—if you so desire—for the legislation to expire. All legislation includes some form of sunrise provisions. Your sunrise/sunset provisions should be a part of section 3 of your legislation. Sample Legislation **Here’s the link to the actual legislation introduced by Brad Sherman (D-CA) I used to create this sample: https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/4312?resultIndex=2 114th Congress 2nd Session H.R. XXXX A bill to amend the Iran Threat Reduction and Syrian Human Rights Act of 2012 to require the President to block and prohibit transactions in property and property interests of a foreign person that knowingly supports certain transactions with Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) or other sanctioned persons if that property and those property interests are in the United States, come within the United States, or are or come within the possession or control of a U.S. person. Section 1. Title: Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps Sanctions Implementation and Review Act Mr. Sherman (for himself) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on International Relations and National Security. Section 2. Statements of Findings: (1) The IRGC has helped train and equip proxy groups and Iraqi Shiite insurgents, and elements of the Taliban, which have targeted and killed United States and other allied forces in Iraq and Afghanistan (2) The Government of Iran continues to engage in serious, systematic, and ongoing violations of human rights, including suppression of freedom of expression and religious freedom, illegitimate detention, torture, and executions, without affording anything resembling an adequate due process. (3) The IRGC plays a significant role in many of Iran’s human rights abuses. (4) Strengthening sanctions against the IRGC, ensuring that the United States Government identify and designate more of the affiliated entities through which the IRGC operates will help deprive the IRGC of resources needed to carry out its nefarious activities. Section 3. Major Themes: (1) Amend subsection (b) of section 302 of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syrian Human Rights Act of 2012 by adding, “the President shall block and prohibit all transactions in property and interests in property with respect to such foreign person if such property and interests in property are in the United States, come within the United States, or are or come within the possession or control of a United States person.” (2) The Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the President and the appropriate congressional committees a report identifying foreign persons not currently subject to sanctions under subsection (b) of section 302 who knowingly engaging in an activity described by the amended section. (3) If sufficient evidence to impose sanctions exists, the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report containing the result of the review and impose all sanctions under subsection (b). (4) Sunrise provision – The amendment to subsection (b) shall take effect after the date that is 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. Committee Descriptions Infrastructure The Committee on Infrastructure will consider all legislation that deals specifically with transportation, national resources, and science and technology issues. These issues include, but are not limited to, agriculture, forestry, ecology, energy policy, environmental policy, emerging technologies, highways and public roads, bridges, railways, airline regulation, and air travel. International Relations and National Security The IR/NS Committee will consider all legislation dealing with bilateral or multilateral relationships between the U.S. and other countries. It will also consider any legislation dealing with international trade, global markets, espionage, diplomacy, drug trafficking and interdiction, the military, base closures, and immigration. Health, Education, and Welfare The Health, Education, and Welfare Committee will consider all legislation that deals with health, education, and welfare issues. These issues include, but are not limited to, health care policy, Medicare, Medicaid, pharmaceutical drugs, Social Security, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (and other poverty programs), education policy, teacher testing, national testing standards, and student loans. Economic Affairs The Economic Affairs Committee will review any piece of legislation that deals with interstate trade, labor issues, consumer protection and consumer affairs, securities and exchange (the stock market, antitrust, monopolies, etc.), work-incentive programs, or other economic issues. This committee will also take on the responsibility of the House Ways and Means Committee and will be responsible for reviewing legislation referred to it to determine its effects on the U.S. budget. Such legislation would include anything proposing a tax increase or tax cut. Government and Judiciary The Government and Judiciary Committee will deal with all internal matters relating to the workings or the conduct of the government, reforms of the House or other government entities, and rules for members of the legislative branch. Issue such as crime, drugs, abortion, and gun control would also fall under this committee’s jurisdiction. In addition, this committee will deal with any veterans’ issues.

Due: April 10th at 11:59 PM (on Moodle) Length: No more than two pages (following the format of the sample legislation) There are several different types of legislation. For this assignment you are writing a “public bill” for introduction into the House of Representatives. Public bills are items of legislation that affect the general welfare or address a general question. Therefore, you’re writing a potential policy that affects a wide range of the general public (or, at least, your constituents). Your public bill will be placed on the House Calendar. Again, there are several different types of legislative calendars depending on the type of legislation being debated. However, we are simplifying the process by using a single calendar for all bills. All bills will be introduced in the second session of the 114th Congress. You do not need to give your bill an “H.R. number.” Use the sample legislation as a formatting guide. Use the following websites to find legislation introduced by the representative you are playing, or create your own legislation based on your representative’s policy goals (refer to assignment #2 for ideas). Use any legislation you find as a guide, but know that you not not have include every single aspect of the legislation into your assignment. Your representative’s .gov website The library of Congress database – http://www.congress.gov (you can search by House member) Steps for Writing your Legislation Step 1 – Write a statement of purpose for the legislation you intend to propose. Some elements are common to all pieces of legislation. For example, every piece of legislation has a statement of purpose that can be found directly beneath its number. This statement of purpose explains what the bill is about. If you look at the sample legislation, you’ll notice these statements of purpose come immediately following the notation, “A bill to…” Step 2 – Give your legislation a title. In addition to a statement of purpose, most major legislation also includes a title—that is, a way of referring to the legislation. Sometimes these titles are simply descriptive (e.g., “Nuclear Threat Reduction Act”); other times, they can be catchy phrases or can be converted to easy-to-remember acronyms (e.g, “Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act or RICO). The title should begin “Section 1” after your statement of purpose. Below the title you need to include a brief paragraph telling everyone that you are introducing the bill. Additionally, you should include the committee you would like the bill to be referred to. Therefore, you need to review the committee descriptions to ensure you select the appropriate committee (found at the end of this document). It is generally a good idea to pick a policy issue covered by the committee you are assigned to. Step 3 – Draft as least one, but as many as are needed, statements of findings or “whereas” clauses for your legislation. Many pieces of legislation include a justification for the legislation. In this case, the justification comes in the form of a statement of findings, which comes after your title. You will need to present some justification for your legislation. Step 3 – Outline the major themes of your legislation. The remainder of the legislation should be focused on the substance of what it is you are trying to accomplish. As you write this section, you will need to separate your main ideas into major headings and include details about each of the subheadings. These details could include the appropriation of funds to support the legislation; they might specify to whom the legislation will apply (what part of the population?); and/or these details may simply clarify your major themes. Be as broad or specific as you feel is necessary to get your message across. Your major themes should be a part of section 3 in your legislation. Refer to the sample legislation to guide you through this process. Step 4 – Draft the approach sunrise and sunset provisions in your legislation. A sunrise provision sets a date for the legislation to take effect. A sunset provision sets a date—if you so desire—for the legislation to expire. All legislation includes some form of sunrise provisions. Your sunrise/sunset provisions should be a part of section 3 of your legislation. Sample Legislation **Here’s the link to the actual legislation introduced by Brad Sherman (D-CA) I used to create this sample: https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/4312?resultIndex=2 114th Congress 2nd Session H.R. XXXX A bill to amend the Iran Threat Reduction and Syrian Human Rights Act of 2012 to require the President to block and prohibit transactions in property and property interests of a foreign person that knowingly supports certain transactions with Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) or other sanctioned persons if that property and those property interests are in the United States, come within the United States, or are or come within the possession or control of a U.S. person. Section 1. Title: Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps Sanctions Implementation and Review Act Mr. Sherman (for himself) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on International Relations and National Security. Section 2. Statements of Findings: (1) The IRGC has helped train and equip proxy groups and Iraqi Shiite insurgents, and elements of the Taliban, which have targeted and killed United States and other allied forces in Iraq and Afghanistan (2) The Government of Iran continues to engage in serious, systematic, and ongoing violations of human rights, including suppression of freedom of expression and religious freedom, illegitimate detention, torture, and executions, without affording anything resembling an adequate due process. (3) The IRGC plays a significant role in many of Iran’s human rights abuses. (4) Strengthening sanctions against the IRGC, ensuring that the United States Government identify and designate more of the affiliated entities through which the IRGC operates will help deprive the IRGC of resources needed to carry out its nefarious activities. Section 3. Major Themes: (1) Amend subsection (b) of section 302 of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syrian Human Rights Act of 2012 by adding, “the President shall block and prohibit all transactions in property and interests in property with respect to such foreign person if such property and interests in property are in the United States, come within the United States, or are or come within the possession or control of a United States person.” (2) The Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the President and the appropriate congressional committees a report identifying foreign persons not currently subject to sanctions under subsection (b) of section 302 who knowingly engaging in an activity described by the amended section. (3) If sufficient evidence to impose sanctions exists, the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report containing the result of the review and impose all sanctions under subsection (b). (4) Sunrise provision – The amendment to subsection (b) shall take effect after the date that is 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. Committee Descriptions Infrastructure The Committee on Infrastructure will consider all legislation that deals specifically with transportation, national resources, and science and technology issues. These issues include, but are not limited to, agriculture, forestry, ecology, energy policy, environmental policy, emerging technologies, highways and public roads, bridges, railways, airline regulation, and air travel. International Relations and National Security The IR/NS Committee will consider all legislation dealing with bilateral or multilateral relationships between the U.S. and other countries. It will also consider any legislation dealing with international trade, global markets, espionage, diplomacy, drug trafficking and interdiction, the military, base closures, and immigration. Health, Education, and Welfare The Health, Education, and Welfare Committee will consider all legislation that deals with health, education, and welfare issues. These issues include, but are not limited to, health care policy, Medicare, Medicaid, pharmaceutical drugs, Social Security, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (and other poverty programs), education policy, teacher testing, national testing standards, and student loans. Economic Affairs The Economic Affairs Committee will review any piece of legislation that deals with interstate trade, labor issues, consumer protection and consumer affairs, securities and exchange (the stock market, antitrust, monopolies, etc.), work-incentive programs, or other economic issues. This committee will also take on the responsibility of the House Ways and Means Committee and will be responsible for reviewing legislation referred to it to determine its effects on the U.S. budget. Such legislation would include anything proposing a tax increase or tax cut. Government and Judiciary The Government and Judiciary Committee will deal with all internal matters relating to the workings or the conduct of the government, reforms of the House or other government entities, and rules for members of the legislative branch. Issue such as crime, drugs, abortion, and gun control would also fall under this committee’s jurisdiction. In addition, this committee will deal with any veterans’ issues.

 

 

Length: No more than two pages (following the format of the sample legislation) There are several different types of legislation. For this assignment you are writing a “public bill” for introduction into the House of Representatives. Public bills are items of legislation that affect the general welfare or address a general question. Therefore, you’re writing a potential policy that affects a wide range of the general public (or, at least, your constituents). Your public bill will be placed on the House Calendar. Again, there are several different types of legislative calendars depending on the type of legislation being debated. However, we are simplifying the process by using a single calendar for all bills. All bills will be introduced in the second session of the 114th Congress. You do not need to give your bill an “H.R. number.” Use the sample legislation as a formatting guide. Use the following websites to find legislation introduced by the representative you are playing, or create your own legislation based on your representative’s policy goals (refer to assignment #2 for ideas). Use any legislation you find as a guide, but know that you not not have include every single aspect of the legislation into your assignment. Your representative’s .gov website The library of Congress database – http://www.congress.gov (you can search by House member) Steps for Writing your Legislation Step 1 – Write a statement of purpose for the legislation you intend to propose. Some elements are common to all pieces of legislation. For example, every piece of legislation has a statement of purpose that can be found directly beneath its number. This statement of purpose explains what the bill is about. If you look at the sample legislation, you’ll notice these statements of purpose come immediately following the notation, “A bill to…” Step 2 – Give your legislation a title. In addition to a statement of purpose, most major legislation also includes a title—that is, a way of referring to the legislation. Sometimes these titles are simply descriptive (e.g., “Nuclear Threat Reduction Act”); other times, they can be catchy phrases or can be converted to easy-to-remember acronyms (e.g, “Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act or RICO). The title should begin “Section 1” after your statement of purpose. Below the title you need to include a brief paragraph telling everyone that you are introducing the bill. Additionally, you should include the committee you would like the bill to be referred to. Therefore, you need to review the committee descriptions to ensure you select the appropriate committee (found at the end of this document). It is generally a good idea to pick a policy issue covered by the committee you are assigned to. Step 3 – Draft as least one, but as many as are needed, statements of findings or “whereas” clauses for your legislation. Many pieces of legislation include a justification for the legislation. In this case, the justification comes in the form of a statement of findings, which comes after your title. You will need to present some justification for your legislation. Step 3 – Outline the major themes of your legislation. The remainder of the legislation should be focused on the substance of what it is you are trying to accomplish. As you write this section, you will need to separate your main ideas into major headings and include details about each of the subheadings. These details could include the appropriation of funds to support the legislation; they might specify to whom the legislation will apply (what part of the population?); and/or these details may simply clarify your major themes. Be as broad or specific as you feel is necessary to get your message across. Your major themes should be a part of section 3 in your legislation. Refer to the sample legislation to guide you through this process. Step 4 – Draft the approach sunrise and sunset provisions in your legislation. A sunrise provision sets a date for the legislation to take effect. A sunset provision sets a date—if you so desire—for the legislation to expire. All legislation includes some form of sunrise provisions. Your sunrise/sunset provisions should be a part of section 3 of your legislation. Sample Legislation **Here’s the link to the actual legislation introduced by Brad Sherman (D-CA) I used to create this sample: https://www.congress.gov/bill/114th-congress/house-bill/4312?resultIndex=2 114th Congress 2nd Session H.R. XXXX A bill to amend the Iran Threat Reduction and Syrian Human Rights Act of 2012 to require the President to block and prohibit transactions in property and property interests of a foreign person that knowingly supports certain transactions with Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps (IRGC) or other sanctioned persons if that property and those property interests are in the United States, come within the United States, or are or come within the possession or control of a U.S. person. Section 1. Title: Iran’s Revolutionary Guard Corps Sanctions Implementation and Review Act Mr. Sherman (for himself) introduced the following bill; which was referred to the Committee on International Relations and National Security. Section 2. Statements of Findings: (1) The IRGC has helped train and equip proxy groups and Iraqi Shiite insurgents, and elements of the Taliban, which have targeted and killed United States and other allied forces in Iraq and Afghanistan (2) The Government of Iran continues to engage in serious, systematic, and ongoing violations of human rights, including suppression of freedom of expression and religious freedom, illegitimate detention, torture, and executions, without affording anything resembling an adequate due process. (3) The IRGC plays a significant role in many of Iran’s human rights abuses. (4) Strengthening sanctions against the IRGC, ensuring that the United States Government identify and designate more of the affiliated entities through which the IRGC operates will help deprive the IRGC of resources needed to carry out its nefarious activities. Section 3. Major Themes: (1) Amend subsection (b) of section 302 of the Iran Threat Reduction and Syrian Human Rights Act of 2012 by adding, “the President shall block and prohibit all transactions in property and interests in property with respect to such foreign person if such property and interests in property are in the United States, come within the United States, or are or come within the possession or control of a United States person.” (2) The Comptroller General of the United States shall submit to the President and the appropriate congressional committees a report identifying foreign persons not currently subject to sanctions under subsection (b) of section 302 who knowingly engaging in an activity described by the amended section. (3) If sufficient evidence to impose sanctions exists, the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report containing the result of the review and impose all sanctions under subsection (b). (4) Sunrise provision – The amendment to subsection (b) shall take effect after the date that is 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act. Committee Descriptions Infrastructure The Committee on Infrastructure will consider all legislation that deals specifically with transportation, national resources, and science and technology issues. These issues include, but are not limited to, agriculture, forestry, ecology, energy policy, environmental policy, emerging technologies, highways and public roads, bridges, railways, airline regulation, and air travel. International Relations and National Security The IR/NS Committee will consider all legislation dealing with bilateral or multilateral relationships between the U.S. and other countries. It will also consider any legislation dealing with international trade, global markets, espionage, diplomacy, drug trafficking and interdiction, the military, base closures, and immigration. Health, Education, and Welfare The Health, Education, and Welfare Committee will consider all legislation that deals with health, education, and welfare issues. These issues include, but are not limited to, health care policy, Medicare, Medicaid, pharmaceutical drugs, Social Security, Aid to Families with Dependent Children (and other poverty programs), education policy, teacher testing, national testing standards, and student loans. Economic Affairs The Economic Affairs Committee will review any piece of legislation that deals with interstate trade, labor issues, consumer protection and consumer affairs, securities and exchange (the stock market, antitrust, monopolies, etc.), work-incentive programs, or other economic issues. This committee will also take on the responsibility of the House Ways and Means Committee and will be responsible for reviewing legislation referred to it to determine its effects on the U.S. budget. Such legislation would include anything proposing a tax increase or tax cut. Government and Judiciary The Government and Judiciary Committee will deal with all internal matters relating to the workings or the conduct of the government, reforms of the House or other government entities, and rules for members of the legislative branch. Issue such as crime, drugs, abortion, and gun control would also fall under this committee’s jurisdiction. In addition, this committee will deal with any veterans’ issues.

Political Science: comparative book review


Political Science:  comparative book review of Charles Taylor’s The Malaise of Modernity, (Concord, Ontario: Anansi Press, 1991) and Jean Bethke Elshtain’s, Democracy on Trial, (Concord, Ontario: Anansi Press, 1993).

The rationale for writing a comparative book review of these two books is that both authors address some fundamental problems associated with modern society. Their analysis of the ills facing liberal-democratic societies should encourage reflection and reassessment of your concerns about contemporary society.

Students will be required to write a (7 page) comparative book review of Charles Taylor’s The Malaise of Modernity, (Concord, Ontario: Anansi Press, 1991) and Jean Bethke Elshtain’s, Democracy on Trial, (Concord, Ontario: Anansi Press, 1993).

Title page must include book titles, authors, city, publisher, date, # of pages, price

A useful book reviews answers the following questions:

What are the authors of the books trying to communicate?

How clear and persuasive are the authors in getting this message across to the reader?

Were the books worth reading? Why is one book better than the other and/or are the authors addressing different parts of the same issue?

The review must have the following component parts:

  1. a) Enticement – first sentence should “hook” the reader into reading your review
  2. b) Examination – Tell the reader what the books is about by explaining main arguments of the books (use in-text documentation when you cite the author)
  3. c) Elucidation – Clarify the books’ value and contribution to the field of Political Studies by defining what the authors are trying to do
  4. d) Evaluation – Having explained what the authors are attempting to do in the books, you should tell the reader how successful the authors were in that objective. Can you tell whether Charles Taylor and Jean Bethke Elshtain have a Christian perspective on the matter and what difference if any it makes to their analysis?

 

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